Raquel Madrigal

Raquel Madrigal is an artist currently in her last year in receiving a Bachelor’s in Fine Art. She was born and raised in New Mexico and is looking to complete her degree in New Mexico State University by the spring of 2018. Primarily, she practices soft sculpture and installation but also works with the mediums drawing, painting, mold making, photography, and jewelry. Her art conceptually addresses family, identity, tradition, and queerness, and has grown to address her interpersonal relationships that has affected her journey as a queer woman. Her work dealing with these topics has been shown in local galleries, the Las Cruces Museum of Art and the University Art Gallery.

 

Project Description:

Title: Identity through Soft Sculpture: Queerness and Interpersonal Relationships

Madrigal’s work focuses on her connections with tradition and interpersonal relationships while being a queer woman. She pulls from her experiences growing up in a Protestant household and focuses on moments with each family member relating to her queer identity. Her process is to use soft sculpture made from her clothing, cotton and hair from wigs to create forms that resemble dismembered figures and interact with the space it inhabits. She also uses found objects to suggest the failure of each relationships to evoke the performative quality of being “in the closet.”

 

Benchmarks:

  • Project description, timeline, and milestones developed with mentor; on file with DSP
  • Complete project
  • Present scholarly work at URCAS
  • Apply for graduate or professional school
  • Apply for an artist residency
  • Apply for solo exhibition or performance

 

Raquel’s mentor: Professor Rachel Stevens:

Professor Rachel Stevens received her BFA in sculpture from the Maryland Institute College of Art (85) and MFA from Syracuse University (93). She has been teaching sculpture at NMSU since 1994. She is the recipient of two Fulbright Scholarships, to Nepal and Ukraine. Her most recent Fulbright in Ukraine culminated in an exhibition that shed light on Jewish culture that thrived before the Holocaust. Rachel has received a Pollock Foundation grant and is represented by William Havu Gallery in Denver. When not teaching or making art, Rachel enjoys exploring diverse landscapes on foot and traveling internationally, activities that inevitably feed into her studio practice.